HZDR research magazine "discovered"

discovered - Valuable Ressources

More information

You want visit our Institutes and follow a guided tour? Please contact our Visitor Service.

Social Media

Facebook Icon     Twitter-Logo         Logo Helmholtz Social Media Newsroom    

Upcoming Events


June 8-10, 2015

GermanTerahertz Conference

Dreikönigskirche Dresden


Calendar of Events


Logo Science Calendar

Initiatives & Cooperation

HZDR: network partner at "Network Dresden - City of Science"

In 2006, the city of Dresden carried the title "City of Science", and founded the network Dresden - City of Science, which has been active ever since. One popular event supported by the network partners in Dresden is the Dresden Long Night of Sciences.


"Charter of Diversity"

HZDR is a member of the "Charter of Diversity", an initiative encouraging diversity in business companies and public institutions. It is supported by the German federal government, the chancellor of Germany being its patron.

Measurement at Big Bang Conditions Confirms Lithium Problem

Press release of August 27, 2014

The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it’s called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct – a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time in experiments conducted at the underground laboratory in the Gran Sasso mountain in Italy. As part of an international team, researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) studied how much lithium forms under Big Bang conditions. The results were published in “Physical Review Letters

 

Lithium, aside from hydrogen and helium, is one of the three elements that are created before the first stars form. These three elements were – according to the theory – already created early on, through what is known as “primordial nucleosynthesis.” That means that when the universe was only a few minutes old, neutrons and protons merged to form the nuclei of the these elements. At the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), the nucleosynthesis of lithium has now been reproduced by an international team of scientists. Michael Anders, who earned his doctorate in the last year at TU Dresden and HZDR on this very topic, took a leading role on the team. Within the framework of a project that was funded by the German Research Foundation, he was supervised by Dr. Daniel Bemmerer, group leader at HZDR.

In the Italian underground laboratory, the scientists fired helium nuclei at heavy hydrogen (known as deuterium) in order to reach energies similar to those just after the Big Bang. The idea was to measure how much lithium forms under similar conditions to those during the early stages of the universe. The result of the experiment: the data confirmed the theoretical predictions, which are incompatible with the observed lithium concentrations found in the universe.

“For the first time, we could actually study the lithium-6 production in one part of the Big Bang energy range with our experiment," explains Daniel Bemmerer. Lithium-6 (three neutrons, three protons) is one of the element’s two stable isotopes. The formation of lithium-7, which possesses an additional neutron, was studied in 2006 by Bemmerer at LUNA.

With these new results, what is known as the "lithium problem" remains a hard nut to crack: on the one hand, now all laboratory results of the astrophysicists suggest that the theory of primordial nucleosynthesis is correct. On the other hand, many observations of astronomers show that the oldest stars in our Milky Way contain only half as much lithium-7 as predicted. Sensational reports by Swedish researchers, who discovered clearly more lithium-6 in such stars than predicted, must also likely be checked again based on the new LUNA data. Bemmerer says, “Should unusual lithium concentrations be observed in the future, we know, thanks to the new measurements, that it cannot be due to the primordial nucleosynthesis.“

Further research will soon be carried out in a new underground laboratory in Dresden

What was important for the studies was the special location of LUNA: in the mountainous Gran Sasso d’Italia, 1400 meters of solid rock keep the disturbance from cosmic radiation at bay. The experimental setup is additionally enveloped in a lead shell. Only with such good shielding can the rare interactions between the nuclei be precisely determined. But within the next year, similar research will also be possible in Dresden. TU Dresden and HZDR will put the accelerator laboratory “Felsenkeller” into operation. Although the solid rock shielding from natural radiation in this former brewery cellar is only forty-five meters, it is already sufficient for many measurements. The new laboratory also possesses a particle accelerator that is more than twelve times as strong: “There we can expand our experiments and study the formation of elements at high energy ranges”, says Bemmerer.

Lithium ist neben Wasserstoff  und Helium eines der drei Elemente, die nicht erst innerhalb von Sternen erzeugt werden. Stattdessen – so die Theorie – sind sie schon früh durch die „primordiale Nukleosynthese“ entstanden. Das heißt: Im nur wenige Minuten alten Universum haben sich Neutronen und Protonen zu den Kernen der ersten drei Elemente verbunden. Am Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) wurde die Kernentstehung von Lithium nun von einem internationalen Forscherteam nachgestellt. Eine führende Rolle im Team nahm Michael Anders ein, der im vergangenen Jahr an der TU Dresden und am HZDR zu dem Thema promoviert hat. Im Rahmen eines von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft geförderten Projekts wurde er dabei von Dr. Daniel Bemmerer, Gruppenleiter am HZDR, betreut.


Publication: M. Anders et al. (2014), First Direct Measurement of the 2H(α,γ)6Li Cross Section at Big Bang Energies and the Primordial Lithium Problem. Physical Review Letters 113, 042501; DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.042501


Further Information

Dr. Daniel Bemmerer
Institute of Radiation Physics at the HDZR
Phone: +49 351 260 3581 | Email: d.bemmerer@hzdr.de

Media Contact:

Dr. Christine Bohnet
Press Officer
Phone +49351 260 2450 oder +49160 969 288 56 | c.bohnet@hzdr.de | www.hzdr.de
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | Bautzner Landstr. 400 | 01328 Dresden