Contact

Coordinator
PD Dr. Peter Zahn

Phone: +49 351 260 3121
E-mail: nanonet@hzdr.de

Spokesperson
PD Dr. Artur Erbe

Phone: +49 351 260 2366
E-mail: a.erbe@hzdr.de

Deputy spokesperson
Prof. Dr. Gianaurelio Cuniberti

Phone: +49 351 463 31414
E-mail: g.cuniberti@tu-dresden.de

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News

Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport through Individually Contacted DNA Origami-Based Au Nanowires,
Langmuir 32, 10159–10165 (2016)
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2016-08-30/09-02
NanoNet International Workshop, Prague, CZ: Best Poster Prize to Jingjing Ye

Compact Nanowire Sensors probe Microdroplets,
Nano Lett. 16, 4991–5000 (2016)

Events

2016-12-07/10
Research Skill Development Course (Y1), Buchenau, DE

2016-12-13
PhD Defense Bezu Teschome, 15:30, TU Dresden, WIL C133 (public event)

2017-03-19/24
DPG Meeting Dresden, TU Dresden

2017-04-18/20
Many paths to interference: ..., MPI-PKS Dresden

2017-04-19/21
Research Skill Development Course (Y3), Bonn, DE

2017-07-31/08-04
EP2DS22-MSS18 Intern. Conference, Pennsylvania State College, PA, USA

2017-08-16/18
Nanonet Annual Workshop, Neuklingenberg (near Dresden)

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Dresden Nano Seminar (TUD)

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Poster IHRS NanoNet

Flyer IHRS NanoNet

Acknowledgment

The IHRS NanoNet is funded by the Initiative and Networking Fund of the Helmholtz Association (VH-KO-606).

Research profile

The design of compact, cheap and energy-saving electronic devices, capable of high performance and multifunctionality is of highest priority in modern nanotechnology. The size of circuit elements of electronic structures has been decreasing ever since the invention of the transistor and integrated circuit, closely following the prediction of Gordon Moore in 1965 (G. E. Moore, Electronics 38, 114 (1965)). Up-to-date industrial fabrication tools allow smallest structure sizes of electronic components on the order of 20 nanometers. Further decreasing this lower limit needs a completely new approach towards the fabrication of electronic structures. Two straightforward routes for the scaling of electronics have been developed: (1) the use of small objects, which are designed using non-conventional fabrication techniques, i.e. using the so-called “beyond Moore” approach; and (2) the construction of single components, which can fulfill more complex tasks than traditional electronic circuit elements, an approach which is commonly called the “more than Moore” approach.

One of the ultimate goals of the IHRS NanoNet is to merge these two approaches by integrating nanosized objects, such as single molecules or metallic nanoparticles, into large interconnected networks, and thereby to fabricate novel nanodevices with tunable structural properties on demand to perform various complex tasks. The real integration of nanoscale electronic components into semiconductor circuits has not yet been achieved and would revolutionize the field of microelectronics and modern nanotechnology.

The research carried out within the IHRS NanoNet can be divided into three interlinked sub-topics:

NanoNet Scientific Profile Scheme