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Innovative ways to battle Parkinson’s disease

Press Release of 26.02.2020

An interdisciplinary team from the Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research headed by Prof. Peter Brust has won HZDR’s (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) third Innovation Contest. The researchers succeeded in developing a new substance that could improve image-based differential diagnostics of Parkinson’s disease. The four-member team, which includes Dr. Thu Hang Lai, Dr. Rodrigo Teodoro and Dr. Magali Toussaint, received the first prize among a total of 21 submissions. They invented a stable molecule that can dock onto receptors on nerve cells and contains a radionuclide, which can be detected by positron emission tomography (PET). The team is now ready for the next decisive step on the way to market approval of the so-called radiotracer: clinical studies to test whether the new substance also proves its value in everyday medical practice.

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Directing nanoparticles straight to tumors

Press Release of 24.02.2020

Modern anticancer therapies aim to attack tumor cells while sparing healthy tissue. An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and FU Berlin has made important progress in this area: the scientists have produced tiny nanoparticles that are designed to specifically target cancer cells. They can navigate directly to the tumor cells and visualize those using advanced imaging techniques. Both in petri dishes and animal models, the scientists were able to effectively guide the nanoparticles to the cancer cells. The next step is to combine the new technique with therapeutic approaches.

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Hermetically sealed semi-conductors

Press Release of 28.01.2020

Tomorrow’s electronics are getting ever smaller. Researchers are thus searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow configurations. Promising elements include the chemical compounds indium selenide (InSe) and gallium selenide (GaSe). In the form of ultra-thin layers, they form two-dimensional (2D) semi-conductors. But, so far, they have hardly been used because they degrade when they get in contact with air during manufacturing. Now, a new technique allows the sensitive material to be integrated in electronic components without losing its desired properties. The method, which has been described in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (DOI: 10.1021/acsami.9b13442), was developed by Himani Arora, a doctoral candidate of physics at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

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