Contact

Coordinator
PD Dr. Peter Zahn

Phone: +49 351 260 3121
E-mail: nanonet@hzdr.de

Spokesperson
Prof. Dr. Artur Erbe

Phone: +49 351 260 2366
E-mail: a.erbe@hzdr.de

Deputy spokesperson
Prof. Dr. Gianaurelio Cuniberti

Phone: +49 351 463 31414
E-mail: g.cuniberti@tu-dresden.de

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News

2022-03-25
Nanocar Race II - ARRIVAL has seen the Dresden GAZE Team on fifth position- Congratulations. More info.

2021-12-17
Bilal Khan defended his PhD thesis at TU Dresden, Faculty of Electr. Engin.: Congratulations!

2020-11-23
NanoNet is sponsor of TU Dresden's Nanocar Race team “German Azulene Explorer – GAZE”, more info.

2021-11-09
New Research Training Group "Supracolloidal Structures: From Materials to Optical and Electronic Components" (GRK 2767) established. more at TUD, more at IPF, Homepage

2020-12-31
Helmholtz funding of NanoNet expired, but the network will continously promote collaboration and exchange of ideas.
Thanks to all members and partners.
Keep in touch!

Events

2022-09-04/09
DPG (Spring) Meeting 2022, Condensed matter section , Regensburg, DE (in presence)

2022-10-04/06
NanoNet+ FWIO FWIM Annual Workshop in Görlitz, Topic: 2D Materials and ultra-high doped semiconductors: electronics, photonics and sensing.

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Dresden Nano Seminar (TUD)

Ascent+ European Nanoelectronics Network

Help Desk

HZDR International Office
Welcome Guide HZDR

List of medical doctors speaking English

Support hotline "Violence against women" (GE/EN/FR/...)

Acknowledgment

IHRS NanoNet was funded by Initiative and Networking Fund of Helmholtz Association (VH-KO-606) until Dec 2020.

Research profile

The design of compact, cheap and energy-saving electronic devices, capable of high performance and multifunctionality is of highest priority in modern nanotechnology. The size of circuit elements of electronic structures has been decreasing ever since the invention of the transistor and integrated circuit, closely following the prediction of Gordon Moore from 1965 (G. E. Moore, Electronics 38, 114 (1965)). Up-to-date industrial fabrication tools allow smallest structure sizes of electronic components on the order of 20 nanometers. Further decreasing this lower limit needs a completely new approach towards the fabrication of electronic structures. Two straightforward routes for the scaling of electronics have been developed: (1) the use of small objects, which are designed using non-conventional fabrication techniques, i.e. using the so-called “beyond-Moore” approach; and (2) the construction of single components, which can fulfill more complex tasks than traditional electronic circuit elements, an approach which is commonly called the “more-than-Moore” approach.

One of the ultimate goals of the IHRS NanoNet is to merge these two approaches by integrating nanosized objects, such as single molecules or metallic nanoparticles, into large interconnected networks, and thereby to fabricate novel nanodevices with tunable structural properties on demand to perform various complex tasks. The real integration of nanoscale electronic components into semiconductor circuits has not yet been achieved and would revolutionize the field of microelectronics and modern nanotechnology.

The research carried out within the IHRS NanoNet can be divided into three interlinked sub-topics:

NanoNet Scientific Profile Scheme